Not Fade Away

Not Fade Away: Backstreet Boys' 'Millennium' Turns 15For one shining moment, the Backstreet Boys captured the hearts of global teendom, unequivocally and universally. They were the biggest and the best. They deserve our respect.
Not Fade Away: It Wasn't Just Music that Made Hole's 'Live Through This' So IconicReleased on April 12, 1994, Hole's landmark Live Through This is an album that is inherently female, unforgivingly dark, and perfectly self-aware.
Not Fade Away: The Pretenders' 'Learning To Crawl'With only half of the original lineup, the band came back with a classic album.
Not Fade Away: 10 Years Later, How Death Cab For Cutie Broke Through with 'Transatlanticism'A lot of people write about Transatlanticism in the framework of The O.C., but that's a narrative that is like congratulating Nike for their hard work on Michael Jordan's legacy.
Not Fade Away: Pearl Jam's 'Vs.' Turns 20'Vs.' set records in the week and a half it took to sell 1.3 million copies in October 1993, and coupled with Nirvana’s feminist-minded In Utero a month earlier, it was the moment where the bands overlapped most in popularity and political-mindedness.
Not Fade Away: Elton John's 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road' - His Ultimate Album?To paraphrase the Ringo Starr classic, it don't always come easy, and that was the case with Elton John's "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road." Elton took his team -- lyricist Bernie Taupin, guitarist Davey Johnstone, bassist Dee Murray, drummer Nigel Olsson and producer Gus Dudgeon -- to Jamaica to record the follow-up to two consecutive #1 albums: 1972's "Honky Chateau" and 1973's "Don't Shoot Me, I'm Only The Piano Player."
Not Fade Away: 25 Years Later, Perry Farrell Talks Jane's Addiction's 'Nothing's Shocking'Decades after its release, 'Nothing's Shocking' routinely pops up on "Best Albums Of All Time" charts. But if anyone ever puts together a "Most Deceptively Titled Albums Of All Time," Nothing's Shocking may top the list.
Not Fade Away: Stevie Wonder Comines Matters Of The Heart And The World On ‘Innervisions’Pretty much everything you love about Stevie Wonder is here: romantic songs and social commentary; soaring ballads and badass funk. It features Stevie as a one-man band and also shows him collaborating with others (including backing singer Lani Groves, bassist Willie Weeks, and guitarist Dean Parks). He croons sweetly, and he belts it out with righteous fury. He gets experimental with the then-new ARP synthesizer, but also he also plays beautiful piano. And let's not forget his relentlessly funky drumming.
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