Is Being In A Boy Band Good For Your Health?

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(Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

(Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

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Will One Direction outlive Justin Bieber? A new study on rock and pop star mortality proves this just might be the case.

There’s good news for boy band fans as researchers from Liverpool John Moores University in Britain revealed “musicians who reached stardom after 1980 have better survival rates.” Additionally, early death for solo artists is double to those in a band, with solo artists from North America having the worst survival rates.

“While this may simply be a proxy for level of fame, with solo performers often attracting more attention than for instance a drummer or keyboard player in a band, it also raises the issue of peer support as a protective factor,” researchers wrote.

Over 200,000 fans, experts and critics helped identify the top 1,000 albums up until 1999 and the top 30 albums each year from 2000-2006. Once this data was collected, researchers identified the date and cause of death for 137 deceased rock stars within the 1,489 artists named.

While the data was limited to those who died, it makes sense. With media coverage impacting the lives of musicians these days more members in a band provide added cushion to the popularity. So, when One Direction’s Harry Styles is dating Taylor Swift, there’s more members to go around and lessen the attention. Justin Bieber is only one guy, which has led to some dangerous moments. Just recently a paparazzo was killed while chasing down his car for a photo. Being from North America himself, which is shown to have the worst survival rates for solo artists, this study may come to be too accurate for Bieber.

-Annie Reuter, CBS Local


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