Street Date: Shakira Returns To Her Roots On “Sale el Sol”

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shakira sale el sol Street Date: Shakira Returns To Her Roots On Sale el Sol

[pullquote quote=”And I’m crazy, but you like it, You like that it ain’t easy” credit=”Shakira from ‘Loca'”]

Before [lastfm]Shakira[/lastfm] exploded onto the American music scene in 2001 with her first bilingual album Laundry Service the Colombian born singer was already a superstar in Latin American countries. Since then, she’s released Oral Fixation and last year’s She Wolf, which was her foray into club music.

In her latest studio effort, Sale el Sol, she’s returned to what she knows best, the fusion between rock and pop heavily influenced from Latino and Colombian music, falling back into a safety net that will please both old and new fans.

Shakira took many risks on She Wolf, however it’s as if she used up all her get out of jail free cards on that album because, although Sale el Sol is a perfectly good album, it lacks a certain edge that audiences have become accustomed to hearing from Shakira.

Despite that, the album has a cohesive sound that is distinctly Shakira. Instead of relying heavily on an infused dance club beat, Shakira fused together a rock-pop sound that both highlights her vocal capabilities and the evolution of her as an artist. As you listen to the album it becomes apparent that Shakira wanted to make a pop album that payed homage to her early work without alienating her new fanbase.

It’s clear that Shakira went in a very defined direction when composing Sale el Sol as she deals heavily with heartbreak and relationships. When asked about this she told the NY Times:

We all go through hard moments. Whatever happened, it’s right there in the songs. I’ve decided that I’m not going to explain every song this time. It’s hard to explain a song. These songs explain me better than I can explain them.

An example of this is in the first single released from the album, “Loca,” which tells the story of a tumultuous relationship with the chorus:

And I’m crazy, but you like it, (Loca, Loca, Loca)

You like that it ain’t easy

Great lyrics tell a story that does not need to be defined and this is one of those scenarios. To over explain the song would not only cheapen the story, but it’s meaning.

Despite the fact that the album takes few risks it manages to encapsulate the evolution of Shakira as a woman, a performer and a musician without cheapening her work or accomplishments.

Sale el Sol track listing:

  1. Sale el Sol” 3:21
  2. “Loca” 3:05
  3. “Antes de las Seis” 2:56
  4. “Gordita” 3:26
  5. “Addicted to You” 2:28
  6. “Lo Que Más” 2:29
  7. “Mariposas” 3:47
  8. “Rabiosa” 2:52
  9. “Devoción” 3:31
  10. “Islands” 2:45
  11. “Tu Boca” 3:27
  12. “Waka Waka (Esto es África)” 3:07
  13. “Loca” (English Version) 3:13
  14. “Rabiosa” (English Version) featuring Pitbull 2:52
  15. “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)” (K-Mix) 3:07

“Waka Waka (This Time For Africa)”:

“Loca” featuring [lastfm]Dizzee Rascal[/lastfm]:

 


shakira 1001 Street Date: Shakira Returns To Her Roots On Sale el Sol
If you like what you hear, check out Sale El Sol available now at iTunes and Amazon.

 

Remember to return every Tuesday for the best album reviews and streams from our friends at Street Date.

Thanks to Sabrina Cognata from Amp for writing this piece.

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